I design and develop interactive objects and spaces,
websites and applications, services and experiences.
I also enjoy photography and playing the jazz piano.


Parallel States

#1 Pattern Bar

Tags Installation / Interactive Space / Experience Lab / Human Sensing

Context Installation at Retune 2016

Team BeAnotherLab Berlin

Time 09/2016 – 10/2016

Tags Installation / Interactive Space / Experience Lab / Human Sensing

Context Installation at Retune 2016

Team BeAnotherLab Berlin

Time 09/2016 – 10/2016

In the psychology lab, different sensing techniques are used as objective measurements for changes in emotional states that are normally invisible to the human eye. What if these same techniques would be applied in the context of everyday social scenarios? Could these novel experiences help augment our understandings of ourselves and others? How might embodied reflections of physiological states and behavioral patterns encourage greater mindfulness, empathy, discovery and interpersonal understanding?

Parallel States Experience Labs #1 Pattern Bar

Parallel States Experience Labs is a series of interactive experiments that aims to bridge the gap between the lab and the everyday by building meaningful methods of engagement for public audiences, and scalable methods for collecting and analyzing data for researchers.

For the Retune festival 2016 in Berlin we created a first setup of the Parallel States Experience Labs and measured patterns of behavioral synchrony and asynchrony during a chat in a bar. After a 10 minutes conversation, participants received the “bill” – their personal value of synchrony.

Setup for the waiter ShowHide details
Parallel States Experience Labs #1 Pattern Bar Setup

The physical setup consists of a bar table, two stools for the participants of the experiment, a floor lamp and a set of speakers for feedback as well as a bar area for the waiter. The stools are equipped with pressure sensors that deliver an estimation of the body postures users take while sitting at the table. Other sensing data are recorded by a human sensing app that runs on the smartphone of the waiter, e.g. the levels of wine in the glasses, changes to the table settings as well as the conversation flow. The current level of participants’ synchrony is reflected in different properties of the room, such as lighting and ambient sound.

Pressure sensing stool

All components of the setup communicate wirelessly via OSC. Two Arduinos take the pressure sensor measurements in the stools, Raspberry Pi micro computers are placed inside stools and lamp, the live projection as well as the sound feedback are generated on laptop computers.

Reflection of synchrony through light

BeAnotherLab Berlin is a newly formed community node of BeAnotherLab which met during Science Hack Day Berlin 2015, where artists, designers, and scientists came together to devise scenarios that speculated on the implications of sharing subjective experiences. BeAnotherLab Berlin explores meaningful applications for embedded technologies across emerging spatial contexts.

In this particular project, my role ranged from co-designing the experience to developing all the components needed for the setup. This reached from the human sensing web app over the physical setup of lamp, stools and table to the back-end software required to connect the different modules.


stefanie-welk.de

Responsive website

Tags Responsive website / UI Design

Context Self-employed

Team Andreas Rau

Time 06/2016 – 07/2016

Tags Responsive website / UI Design

Context Self-employed

Team Andreas Rau

Time 06/2016 – 07/2016

For German artist Stefanie Welk I designed and developed a minimalist portfolio website. Three layers line out the main sections of content: A news section, a gallery of the artist’s work as well as a short biography. The website features Erin McLaughlin’s Yantramanav as the only typeface.

Detail of the website stefanie-welk.de Detail of the website stefanie-welk.de Detail of the website stefanie-welk.de Visit website

Teutates One

Installation

Tags Installation / Interactive Space / Experience

Context Self-initiated

Team Luis Krummenacher and Andreas Rau

Time 04/2016

Tags Installation / Interactive Space / Experience

Context Self-initiated

Team Luis Krummenacher and Andreas Rau

Time 04/2016

Teutates One explores the experience of the sky falling down on your head. We all know from the Asterix comics that this is something to be aware of. Therefore, my friend Luis and I built an apparatus that tries to create this experience.

One day, Luis actually had the experience of the sky falling down on his head in his bathroom. It turned out that it hadn't been the sky after all, only the mirror tilted a bit towards the room—far enough to almost tip over. This incident inspired us to build Teutates One.

After many experiments, we decided for an upright mirror of 70 x 160 cm size. The mirror is held in place with a little hook attached to a servo. At random times, it releases the mirror to tilt downwards from where it is been pulled back up again with a tailor-made winch.


DigiFys

An interactive play environment

Tags Research / Interactive space / Physical Computing / Tangible interaction / Arduino

Context Master’s thesis at KTH Stockholm

Team Jasper Heeffer and Andreas Rau

Time 01/2015 .– 06/2015

Tags Research / Interactive space / Physical Computing / Tangible interaction / Arduino

Context Master’s thesis at KTH Stockholm

Team Jasper Heeffer and Andreas Rau

Time 01/2015 .– 06/2015

For my master’s thesis we designed and prototyped a set of interactive sound and light installations for playgrounds.

We deployed and tested the installations for one week in a Swedish school yard to examine the consequences of digitally augmented play structures on children’s play.

Two children happily playing at a communication station A group of children standing on and around buttons underneath two glowing rings

Artifacts from regular playgrounds were digitally augmented to create a more engaging play experience. The installation with rings and large buttons, for example, evoked the fantasy of the children.

ShowHide details

Our installations were based on two concepts: a tube to cast objects through and a communication system for the playground.

Throwing objects through tubes is a common game among children. The interactive tube adds on this by playing back sounds each time an object falls through. Additionally, an overall soundscape increases in intensity with the activity level.

A group of children around a long wooden tube nestled to a slope

Communication is basic to all kinds of games. Like with a walkie-talkie, children can connect to different stations in the playground and talk with their peers there. The three stations we built took different shapes and were placed in different locations of the school yard.

Try the concepts in the interactive sketch below.

image/svg+xml

Interactive tube: Click to throw the stones through the tube and it will respond with sounds.

Communication: Push and hold one of the buttons to connect to another station

With my thesis, I wanted to focus on my interest in interactive architecture. The project brought in two more interesting aspects: landscape and children’s play. The consideration of these three components gave me insights into the relation between space, people and technology.

Through the cooperation with partners from industry and academia we had good prerequisites to carry out a project of this dimension. Among the partners were the Swedish playground manufacturer HAGS, landscape architects and a software consultancy.

Download my thesis (PDF, 2.5 MB) Cutting a piece of wood in a large buzz saw

I participated in all phases of the project, ranging from early prototyping over manufacturing the prototypes for evaluation and carrying out the user research necessary for my and my fellow student’s theses.

My role was set by the aim of my thesis: to find out about the interplay between technology, environment and play. Therefore, I focused mainly on the design decisions regarding these connections, took main responsibility for the communication concept and did a major share of the project documentation aside the theses. Generally, my focus was more conceptual whereas my colleague worked more on early low-fidelity prototypes.

A speaking funnel on top of a rock

The DigiFys project is further continued by the other project partners from industry and academia. The first results got published in a workshop at ACE 2015 in Iskandar, Malaysia.


The Peripipe

A wooden smoking pipe
as a remote control

Tags Experimental design / Tangible interaction / Materiality / Arduino / JavaScript

Context Physical Interaction Design at KTH Stockholm

Team Tommy Feldt, Sarah Freilich, Shaun Mendonsa, Daniel Molin, Andreas Rau

Time 09/2014 .– 10/2014

Tags Experimental design / Tangible interaction / Materiality / Arduino / JavaScript

Context Physical Interaction Design at KTH Stockholm

Team Tommy Feldt, Sarah Freilich, Shaun Mendonsa, Daniel Molin, Andreas Rau

Time 09/2014 .– 10/2014

The Peripipe is an exploration of how interaction design can create emotional bonds between user, artifact and the performed action.

We assigned the functions of a remote control for a music player to a wooden smoking pipe. Users can control playlists on their phones by sips and puffs with the pipe.

Animation of a puff into the Peripipe which glows red and smokes ShowHide details

By using the shape of a smoking pipe (a culturally loaded artifact), handcrafting it from cherry wood (beautiful natural material) and controlling the pipe through breath (an interaction modality trained from the first day on) we aimed to create an interface that supports the emotional importance of an act like listening to music better than a conventional remote control, being a rather technical artifact.

Carving the wooden bowl of the pipeInside the Peripipe: batteries, wires, an Arduino, LEDs and more.

Due to the size of all the components we needed to fit into the pipe, it was necessary to carve our own bowl on top of the original pipe. In the end, everything fit in.

My contribution to this project reached from early ideation over javascript and Arduino programming to woodworking and the electronics of the final prototype. I was less involved in writing and poster layout but created the illustrations of the prototype and was editing the video.

Overview of the parts inside the Peripipe
Sketches of the shape of the wooden containerSketches of possible attachments of the bowl to the original pipe

The Peripipe was demonstrated, among other places, at the conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, NIME 2015, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA.


The Fetus Speaks

Prenatal bonding between fetus and parents

Tags Experimental design / Tactile interaction / Audio generation / Arduino / PureData / Focus group

Context Multimodal Interaction and Interfaces at KTH Stockholm

Team Jasper Heeffer, Wouter Nij Bijvank, Charles Windlin, Andreas Rau

Time 12/2014 .– 01/2015

Tags Experimental design / Tactile interaction / Audio generation / Arduino / PureData / Focus group

Context Multimodal Interaction and Interfaces at KTH Stockholm

Team Jasper Heeffer, Wouter Nij Bijvank, Charles Windlin, Andreas Rau

Time 12/2014 .– 01/2015

The relationship between mother, father and fetus during pregnancy has a profound influence on the well-being of all involved parties. In this project, we aimed to strengthen this prenatal bonding through design.

We designed and prototyped a pair of belts that senses movements of a fetus inside the mother’s womb and makes those movements sensible for the father.

Additionally, we made the fetal movements audible in a piece of generative music, created by the fetus.

Similing pregnant woman ShowHide details
Illustration of the sensor belt

The sensor belt picks up the fetal movements with a set of piezo discs. An Arduino microcontroller processes the data and transmits it to the other belt.

Illustration of the vibration belt

The actuators, small vibration motors, produce the tactile sensation for the father. They are encased in little plastic tubes to strengthen the sensation and controlled with an Arduino microcontroller via H-bridges.

Working at the workshop at KTH

After participating in the ideation phase and background research, in this project I was mainly responsible for the vibration belt including sewing, electronics, laser cutting, and coding. Furthermore, I wrote the storyboard and shot the video, created a poster and the illustrations for video and project report and participated in the writing as well as the focus group we did for evaluation. I was less involved in the generative music piece, the sensation belt and editing the video.


SoundSpace

A multiuser music sequencer

Tags UI design / NUI / Sensor fusion / Multitouch / Kinect / Processing

Context Experimental User Interfaces at Aalto University

Team Dénes Bencze and Andreas Rau

Time 11/2013 .– 12/2013

Tags UI design / NUI / Sensor fusion / Multitouch / Kinect / Processing

Context Experimental User Interfaces at Aalto University

Team Dénes Bencze and Andreas Rau

Time 11/2013 .– 12/2013

There are many music sequencing apps on the app stores. We designed another one, with a twist. SoundSpace was designed for a large multitouch table to make multi user performances possible. Additionally, we used hand gestures to apply filters on the generated piece of music.

This project was an exploration of fusing touch interaction on a multitouch table with gestures recognized by a Kinect. We tried to design a meaningful and engaging interaction concept for live performances.

Operating a multitouch table with one hand, the free hand is risen ShowHide details
Overview of the UI components

In this project, I was responsible for the UI of the multitouch table and frontend programming in Processing. Together, we created the idea and developed the interaction model. My team mate was programming the backend of the Processing application.


Kickables

Tangibles for feet

Tags Research / Multitouch Floor / Interactive Space / NUI / Foot Interaction

Context Bachelor’s thesis at Hasso Plattner Institute

Team J. Jasper, S. Köhler, A. Pohl, H. Rantzsch, P. Schmidt, C. Sterz, Y. Yurchenko, A. Rau

Time 10/2012 .– 04/2013

Tags Research / Multitouch Floor / Interactive Space / NUI / Foot Interaction

Context Bachelor’s thesis at Hasso Plattner Institute

Team J. Jasper, S. Köhler, A. Pohl, H. Rantzsch, P. Schmidt, C. Sterz, Y. Yurchenko, A. Rau

Time 10/2012 .– 04/2013

Tangible objects as interactive components for computer systems are getting more and more popular. However, most tangibles make use of the capabilities of our hands. In contrast to that, we created tangible interaction modules that users can operate with their feet, by kicking, rolling or dragging objects on the floor.

The meaning that is transported in the physical properties of interactive objects has strong affordances which is especially important for first-time users. Therefore, Kickables suggest to be used in large public installations, such as museum exhibits. Letting the interaction happen on the floor makes it more of a public act than the small-scale interaction with hands.

Different sets of tangibles for feet ShowHide details

We developed five different sets of controls for foot interaction. Each of them explores a different design principle and has different physical constraints.

In this project, I was taking the role of the art director, being responsible for all the graphics, the communication between the student project team and the advisors as well as parts of the front-end programming in QML. Furthermore, I was involved in all interaction design decisions regarding the pressure sensitive floor, writing the paper, designing the poster and shooting the video. I participated less in the back-end programming and the later solution for arbitrary (non pressure-sensitive) floors.

Structure of the pressure-sensitive floor used in the project.

The Kickables concept was published as a full paper at CHI 2014 in Toronto, Canada. The research done in this project served as a base for my bachelor’s thesis.


KAIKKI

Public transport for the visually impaired

Tags UX design / Inclusive Design / Service design / Business modelling / Innovation

Context Aalto Service Camp at Aalto University

Team Aftab Ansari, Riddhi Sheth, Josef Niederreiter, Zhan Wen, Andreas Rau

Time 04/2014 .– 05/2014

Tags UX design / Inclusive Design / Service design / Business modelling / Innovation

Context Aalto Service Camp at Aalto University

Team Aftab Ansari, Riddhi Sheth, Josef Niederreiter, Zhan Wen, Andreas Rau

Time 04/2014 .– 05/2014

People with visual impairments often have difficulties using public transportation. In this project, we developed a concept that would make it possible for them to use all public transportation without assistance, giving them a bit more freedom.

Visually impaired people using public transport independently

The bus system in Helsinki region is especially difficult to use with a visual impairment, since one has to give a visual clue to the bus driver to stop the bus. Therefore, the visually impaired are dependent on assistance to use buses or they have to rely on taxis.

Travelling with a visually impaired person

We prototyped and tested different approaches and in the end developed a handheld device that would read out the numbers and directions of buses that arrive at the respective bus stop and have a button to notify the bus driver of the visually impaired person waiting for their bus.

ShowHide details

This project was part of the Aalto Service Camp, an intense 6-week business model development course at Aalto University in Helsinki in cooperation with HSL, the public transport service provider in Helsinki region. Our work included interviews with end users, ideation and concept creation, validating these concepts, creating and pivoting our business model and pitching the results in the end of each week.

See the final presentation (10 mins, given by myself) in the video below. We also created a small website that explains the concept in detail.

At our final presentaion, HSL got interested in the concept and considered bringing it forward. Since large organisations tend to move slowly, nothing considerable has happened so far.


Waiting… still waiting

Designing the waiting experience for a children’s hospital

Tags User-centered design / UX / Prototyping / Concept development

Context Strategic User-centered Design at Aalto University

Team Miikka Hämäläinen, Lauri Naalisvaara, Harri Lampi, Andreas Rau

Time 01/2014 .– 02/2014

Tags User-centered design / UX / Prototyping / Concept development

Context Strategic User-centered Design at Aalto University

Team Miikka Hämäläinen, Lauri Naalisvaara, Harri Lampi, Andreas Rau

Time 01/2014 .– 02/2014

A large share of the time patients spend at the hospital is waiting time. Therefore, it is important to carefully design the waiting areas, their appearance, the services and possibilities offered. For the new children’s hospital of Helsinki, we developed four different concepts to create a pleasant waiting experience.

Download concept summary (PDF, 0.7 MB) A cardboard model of a waiting area at a children’s hospital ShowHide details

Waiting… still waiting was a clear user-centered design project in which we could take advantage of design methodology ranging from various ideation techniques to different prototyping methods. An additional challenge was the design for and with children that required us to take special considerations in selecting the methods as well as designing the concepts.

The affinity diagram we created as an outcome of our user research.

Since we were working with Finnish children, my role in the project was a bit limited due to language deficiencies. Therefore, I put my focus on the phases and activities that did not involve direct verbal communication with the children, being observations at the hospital, ideation, concept design, documentation and presentation.

The four personas we used to guide our design decisions.

Our concept designs were awarded to be presented at the annual Masters of Aalto exhibition—an exhibition of exceptional Aalto University graduation projects.


NordiCap

App for the NordiCHI conference 2014

Tags UI design / Contextual interview / Usability testing / Paper prototyping

Context Interaction Design and Evaluation at Aalto University

Team Antti Silventoinen, Eeva Erkko, Lotta Ahonen, Dénes Bencze, Andreas Rau

Time 03/2014 .– 05/2014

Tags UI design / Contextual interview / Usability testing / Paper prototyping

Context Interaction Design and Evaluation at Aalto University

Team Antti Silventoinen, Eeva Erkko, Lotta Ahonen, Dénes Bencze, Andreas Rau

Time 03/2014 .– 05/2014

For the NordiCHI conference 2014 we conducted usability tests with three common conference applications and then gave a recommendation to the NordiCHI team.

Furthermore, we designed and prototyped our own version of a conference application with better usability.

A smartphone showing the schedule of a fictional conference with an accordion approach that folds and unfolds details of events

We made use of a broad range of interaction design methods, including contextual interviews, heuristic evaluation, usability tests and paper prototypes. We also designed an HTML prototype (see above).

Woman testing an application on a smartphone Testing a paper prototype of a smarthphone app ShowHide details

In this project, we started with contextual interviews to find out about users and task. Then, we selected three popular existing conference applications and conducted a heuristic evaluation on them. Using the same apps, we carried out usability tests with nine potential users from industry and academia.

Three conference applications from MobileHCI, CHI and MedInfo conference

Our insights led to a recommendation for the NordiCHI team and to two concepts for a refined version of a conference app which we implemented in paper prototypes. Validating these concepts with end users guided the design decisions for our final interactive HTML prototype.

Two different paper prototypes and a more refined HTML version Try the interactive prototype (optimized for iPhone)

As the team leader, I took part in all phases of the project from usability reviews over moderating user tests to creating the different prototypes and presentations of the project.

The NordiCHI team after all decided to follow our recommendation and gave their assignment to the development team of the application that was the winner of our usability tests.


Bogenbau Wohlleber

Corporate design

Tags Corporate design / Responsive website

Context Self-employed

Team Andreas Rau

Time 10/2015 .– 12/2015

Tags Corporate design / Responsive website

Context Self-employed

Team Andreas Rau

Time 10/2015 .– 12/2015

Based on an existing logo, I completely redesigned the corporate identity of Berlin-based bowmaker Mathias Wohlleber including all offline and online touchpoints.

Crafting a bow Detail of the print products Color scheme suiting the bowmaking theme Overview of the corporate design

The identity features the amazing Vollkorn typeface by Friedrich Althausen. The color scheme took inspiration from materials in the workshop.

Front page of the website Detail of the website

The main goal of the website was to inform customers about location and opening hours of the workshop. The current version of the website does not contain any additional information (though this is in planning).

Visit website (work in progress)

vicca.fi

Responsive website

Tags Responsive website / Interaction Design

Context Self-employed

Team Gabe Wong and Andreas Rau

Time 12/2013

Tags Responsive website / Interaction Design

Context Self-employed

Team Gabe Wong and Andreas Rau

Time 12/2013

For the master’s program in visual culture and contemporary art, ViCCA at Aalto University in Helsinki I co-designed and developed a responsive website.

My friend Gabe Wong did the logo and some graphic design while I was responsible for the UI and interaction design and the wordpress template.

Detail of the website vicca.fi Detail of the website vicca.fi Visit website

My opinion of Andreas is very positive. Especially his contributions to the research projects were substantial. In addition, he has a strong sense of design, and brings a lot of positive energy to the group. So, in summary, I have gotten to know Andreas as a very enthusiastic, constructive, and enjoyable-to-work-with student.
I rank Andreas top 5% in the context
of his semester.

Prof. Dr. Patrick Baudisch, former advisor

I highly recommend Andreas for his as well analytic as effective work method and his constructive communication skills. Especially, he combines a sharp sense for interactive conditions with highly sophisticated development skills and did an excellent job in this position. He was a very important team member because he is very ambitious in developing high quality solutions
and extremely organised and reliable.

Dr. Carsten Mohs, former employer



Academic Publications

DIS 2016 Designing for Children's Outdoor Play.
J. Back, C. Heeffer, S. Paget, A. Rau, E.-L. Sallnäs Pysander, A. Waern.
In Proc. of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 10 pages
(Received an Honourable Mention Award)

pdf (23 MB)
CHI 2016 Designing Children's Digital-Physical Play in Natural Outdoors Settings.
J. Back, C. Heeffer, S. Paget, A. Rau, E.-L. Sallnäs Pysander, A. Waern.
In Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts, 8 pages

pdf (5 MB)
ACE 2015 DigiFys: The Interactive Play Landscape.
A. Waern, J. Back, E.-L. Sallnäs Pysander, C. J. H. Heeffer, A. Rau, S. Paget, L. Petterson.
Workshop at Advances in Computer Entertainment 2015

pdf (0.3 MB)
NIME 2015 The Peripipe: A Sip-and-Puff Remote Control for Music Playback.
T. Feldt, S. Freilich, S. Mendonsa, D. Molin, A. Rau.
Demo at the Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression 2015

pdf (0.4 MB) / video (vimeo)
SMC 2014 Puff, Puff, Play: The Peripipe Remote Control.
T. Feldt, S. Freilich, S. Mendonsa, D. Molin, A. Rau.
Demo at Sound and Music Computing Sweden Conference 2014

pdf (0.1 MB) / video (vimeo)
CHI 2014 Kickables: Tangibles for Feet.
D. Schmidt, R. Ramakers, E. Pedersen, J. Jasper, S. Köhler, A. Pohl, H. Rantzsch, A. Rau, P. Schmidt, C. Sterz, Y. Yurchenko, P. Baudisch.
In Proceedings of CHI 2014, 10 pages

pdf (1.4 MB) / video (youtube) / poster (0.2 MB)
CHI 2013 Gesture Output: Eyes-Free Output Using a Force Feedback Touch Surface.
A. Roudaut, A. Rau, C. Sterz, M. Plauth, P. Lopes, P. Baudisch.
In Proceedings of CHI 2013, 10 pages

pdf (1.1 MB) / video (youtube) / poster (7.4 MB)
WHC 2013 Gesture Output: Eyes-Free Output Using a Force Feedback Touch Surface.
C. Sterz, A. Rau, A. Roudaut, P. Baudisch.
Demo at World Haptics Conference 2013
Andreas Rau sitting on a sofa waving his hand Andreas Rau sitting on a sofa

Contact me!

I would be happy to hear from you. You can drop me a line at interaction@andreasrau.eu or call me at +49 157 74646552.

Impressum

Andreas Rau

— Impressum

Angaben gemäß § 5 TMG:
Andreas Rau
Utrechter Str. 46
13347 Berlin

Telefon: +49 157 74646552
E-Mail: interaction@andreasrau.eu